What to eat for energy?

cookies

Did you know that the food you eat has a direct impact on your energy?

 

With the right sort of fuel, you can boost your concentration, productivity, mood and more. But there’s far more to it than simply eating enough calories. When it comes to feeling full of life, the quality of your food counts too.

The good news is that some of the most energy-supporting foods are also the most ordinary (and delicious!). Choose from the ten energising foods below and you’ll soon be seizing the day.

Apples

The humble apple is a great energy-boosting snack: it contains both fibre for slow-release energy and natural sugars for a quick pick-me-up. How to eat: simply enjoy fresh!

 

Oats

These really are a smart carb. Not only are they high in filling fibre, but they also contain the mineral manganese and phosphorus, which contributes to normal energy-yielding metabolism. How to eat: Try Nairn's Oatcakes or Flatbreads with a topping instead of bread for lunches, or make some Energy Cookies.

 

Leafy green Vegetables

Kale, spinach and chard contain iron and magnesium—minerals that play a key role in keeping you feeling energised. How to eat: steam a handful of leaves for an easy side dish.

 

Beetroot

This vibrant vegetable helps to support blood flow, enabling energy-boosting oxygen to get all around your body. How to eat: bake slowly for a delicious addition to your Sunday roast.

 

Fish

Fish is good source of B vitamins, which also help you release energy from your food. Enjoy trout, salmon, halibut, sardines, cod, mackerel and more. How to eat: roast a fillet of salmon, or enjoy some mackerel pate on oatcakes.

 

Dark chocolate

Like beetroot, the antioxidants in cocoa support energising blood flow to your brain and muscles. Choose 70% dark chocolate and above. How to eat: enjoy a square of dark chocolate as a sweet end to a meal. 


Chia seeds

These little seeds have become popular in recent years. They’re rich in energy-sustaining fibre and also contain omega-3 fats, which have been found to reduce fatigue. How to eat: blend into your smoothie, or use to make overnight oats. Lentils Full of both protein and fibre, lentils keep you feeling satisfied and provide a slow-release form of energy. They contain iron too. How to eat: make a quick and easy dhal, or stir a handful of lentils into your Bolognese.

 

Pumpkin seeds

Rich in essential fats, these seeds are a useful source of stored energy. Like oats, they also contain metabolism-supporting manganese. How to eat: sprinkle on top of porridge, soups and salads. Bananas A rich source of carbohydrates and vitamin B6, a banana is a great choice when you need an energy hit. Studies have even found they helping sporting performance. How to eat: enjoy whole, or mash up and use in healthy baking.

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